A group of Malawian women in the
Maternity Waiting Room

Promoting facility-based childbirth is a global strategy for improving both maternal and newborn outcomes. However, around the world-in both industrialized and low- and middle-income countries- too many women who give birth in health facilities face undignified conditions, a lack of services and resources, and poor quality of care.  Health care worker performance is often hindered by sub-optimal care environments, including poor infrastructure, limited supplies, heavy workloads and insufficient support. Advancing quality of maternal and newborn health care requires an equal focus on the provision and experience of care. 

For information on our woman-centered care work,
explore the following pages:

Accelerating Evidence to Policy and Programs: Strengthening Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, Child, and Adolescent Health (RMNCAH) Systems in Africa

The Accelerating Evidence to Policy and Programs: Strengthening Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, Child, and Adolescent Health (RMNCAH) Systems in Africa webinar series was launched on December 8, 2020. The series is guided by global anchor partners and regional partners and advances USAID’s evidence-to-use priorities while targeting decision-makers in sub-Saharan Africa. Previous webinars can be viewed below and upcoming webinars in the HEARD network are featured on the Webinar Series page.

Accelerating the Use of Evidence in Support of Resilient and Respectful RMNCAH Systems in Sub-Saharan Africa

On Tuesday, December 8th from 3-5pm EAT (Nairobi), the East, Central, and Southern Africa Health Community and the University of California San Francisco led the first webinar in a series entitled “Accelerating Evidence to Use in Policy and Programs.” The event featured a discussion about the state of Reproductive, Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health (RMNCAH) systems, services, and priorities in the region and highlighted stakeholder perspectives across a range of topics to be featured in the forthcoming webinar series, which include: family planning; high quality and respectful maternal services; nutrition and WASH vulnerabilities among the urban poor; and data-informed policy approaches to ending violence against children.  Click here to view the full webinar >

Innovative Strategies in Family Planning: Valuable Lessons from East Africa

On Tuesday, February 23rd from 4-5pm EAT (Nairobi), the East, Central, and Southern Africa Health Community and the University of California San Francisco co-led a webinar entitled: “Innovative Strategies in Family Planning: Valuable Lessons from East Africa.” This webinar was the second in the Accelerating Evidence to Use in Policy and Programs: Strengthening & Sustaining RMNCAH Systems in Sub-Saharan Africa webinar series. The event explored innovations that address access, misconceptions, and implementation strategies for new family planning methods, as well as featured a panel discussion hosted by Dr. Sandra McCoy. Click here to view the full webinar >

Respectful Maternal Care: Are we trending in the right direction? A conversation about RMC Approaches and Routine Monitoring & Evaluation

On Tuesday, May 25th from 4-5pm EAT (Nairobi), the East, Central, and Southern Africa Health Community and the University of California San Francisco co-led a webinar entitled: “Respectful Maternal Care: Are we trending in the right direction?” This webinar was the third in the Accelerating Evidence to Use in Policy and Programs: Strengthening & Sustaining RMNCAH Systems in Sub-Saharan Africa webinar series. The event explored evidence, experiences and perspectives on routine monitoring and evaluation for respectful maternal care in Africa. This webinar was co-hosted by the East, Central, and Southern Africa Health Community and the University of California San Francisco. Click here to view the full webinar >

Using collaborative learning approaches to accelerate better practices and policy for MNCH priorities

On Thursday, 15 July 2021 from 8:30-10am EDT, the USAID HRP webinar hosted Dr. Emily Peca and Dr. Jim Sherry from the HEARD Project. They showcased examples of using communities of practice and knowledge management hubs to expand understanding and application of adaptive learning approaches to improve health outcomes. View now >